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The 56th Munich Security Conference is taking place at Hotel Bayerischer Hof in Munich from February 14 to 16. For these days, Munich will again be at the center of international diplomacy and welcome world leaders from politics, academia, and civil society.


This year one of the main themes is "Westlessness" which is – a widespread feeling of uneasiness and restlessness in the face of increasing uncertainty about the enduring purpose of the West. A multitude of security challenges seem to have become inseparable from what some describe as the decay of the Western project. What is more, Western societies and governments appear to have lost a common understanding of what it even means to be part of the West. Although perhaps the most important strategic challenge for the transatlantic partners, it appears uncertain whether the West can come up with a joint strategy for a new era of great-power competition.


There would be a series of panels around the this theme and peace and security across the Atlantic and around the world. The panel discussion "Westlessness in the World: Multilateralism in a Changing International Order" features Heiko Maas (Federal Minister of Foreign Affairs, Federal Republic of Germany), Subrahmanyam Jaishankar (Minister of External Affairs, Republic of India), Margrethe Vestager (Executive Vice President for a Europe Fit for the Digital Age, European Commission), Kang Kyung-Wha (Minister of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Korea), Lindsey O. Graham (Senator, Chairman of the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, United States of America), and Amrita Narlikar (President, German Institute of Global and Area Studies; Moderator) during the panel discussion "Westlessness in the World: Multilateralism in a Changing International Order".







As the coronavirus outbreak continues to accelerate, the international community is facing a global crisis with public health, geopolitical, and economic repercussions. In the two months since the initial outbreak, doubts over the trustworthiness of information from the Chinese government and other sources, combined with a lack of comprehensive timely scientific understanding of the virus, have stoked fears of an uncontrollable global pandemic. Meanwhile, Chinese criticism of US “overreaction” and delayed acceptance of US medical support suggest that geopolitical considerations continue to limit effective coordinated responses to the outbreak. Likewise, as industries dependent on China for their supply chains are directly impacted as a result of the crisis, concerns are also mounting that the outbreak could further decelerate Chinese economic growth and undermine global growth outlook.


What are the latest projections for the further development of the coronavirus outbreak in China and worldwide? How are health-related misinformation and disinformation shaping the crisis? How does a global health emergency such as this affect geopolitics, including the unfolding strategic competition between the United States and China? What might be the broader geopolitical and economic consequences? Ultimately, how can the United States, Europe, China, and other nations and key non-state actors cooperate to stop the spread of the virus and mitigate the global economic repercussions?


Iran failed space launch for satellite has given indication of troubled program yet it remains a step towards developing its ballistic missiles program.


Secretary of State Michael Pompeo has issued the following statement following this failed attempt by the Iranians.


The Iranian regime uses satellite launches to develop its ballistic missile capabilities. The technologies used to launch satellites into orbit are virtually identical and interchangeable with those used in longer range systems, including intercontinental ballistic missiles. Each launch, whether failed or not, further allows Iran to gain experience using such technologies that could benefit its missile programs under the guise of a peaceful space program.


Iran’s series of space launches reflects the failure of the Iran deal to constrain testing that could support further advancement of Iran’s ballistic missile program. The Iran deal lifted the prohibition on Iran’s missile testing and development of systems capable of delivering nuclear weapons and we are seeing the dangerous consequences today. The world’s leading state sponsor of terrorism should not be allowed to develop and test ballistic missiles. This common sense standard must be restored by the international community.

Iran failed space launch for satellite has given indication of troubled program yet it remains a step towards developing its ballistic misseles program.

The United States will continue to build support around the world to confront the Iranian regime’s reckless ballistic missile activity, and we will continue to impose enormous pressure on the regime to change its behavior.

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